Luxury Yacht Vacations, Charter Marketing, Yacht Brokerage and New Construction

Sacks Yachts Magazine

Subscribe to Sacks Yachts Magazine: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Sacks Yachts Magazine: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Sacks Yachts Authors: Paresh Sagar, Steve Mordue, Jason Bloomberg

Blog Post

It Just Keeps Getting Better

It was fifteen years ago that I fished Lynn Lake and I got skunked



It was fifteen years ago that I fished Lynn Lake and I got skunked.  There was no dock but a sand ramp that ran off into the lake.  It was a nightmare getting the boat in and out of the water.  The wind came up and blew about 25 to 30 mph and the friend I was with was hanging on for dear life.  I was too.  The weather however on this trip was outstanding and there was a private dock installed with a decent ramp.  It was off to Lynn.  My wife and I went on this trip.

 

This is the Flicker Shad Pam used to nail all the fish.  I use the scientific method of picking a color based on weather and color of the water.  She picks a lure based on whether she likes the color.  Guess who catches the most fish.


We pulled up to Lynn.   I remembered it as before with a road that ran right down to the water.  You make a right turn and proceed down a road that says "Dead End," but that is where you want to go.  You are greeted by a large pole with a sign that says to deposit $5.00 which is good for all day.  You fill out a slip of paper with your vehicle and license plate.  There is hardly any room to park and turn around. The ramp falls right into deep water and it makes getting the boat on and off really easy.

 

We both had a fish on so Pam grabbed the gaff to haul her's in.  I lost mine when I dropped the rod tip to give her instructions which she did not need.

 

The standard size applies on the lake with a 15 inch minimum and only one fish over 20 inches.  We met a young college student who had been fishing some standing timber as he was coming in and showed us his catch.  Wow, these were really nice fish and he was within 100 yards of the dock.  Why go chasing all over the lake?  There was no one around and the young man recommended we stay close to the dock area as most of the fisherman headed north.  That is what we did.

 

 

That is the boat ramp you pay $5.00 to launch your boat.  The dock was good, and depth at the ramp was excellent and you did not have to worry about smacking your motor.  Parking was a problem and it took some planning to get yourself situated.

 

We moved over to an area just west of the boat dock and it wasn't long before the action started.  Running the Flicker Shad like I did at Pierre the day before started producing fish.  Northern hit first so we moved out a little deeper and there was the walleye.  Pam nailed a really nice one that was about 18 inches.

 Berkley Flicker Shad Crankbaits


Berkley Flicker Shad Crankbaits

Multiple colors available.  If you are not fishing with a Flicker Shad, you are not fishing.

 

Soon I picked up a good walleye and a northern. The action was solid and the fish were hitting hard.  Having spent a total of 90 minutes on the water, we were limited out and it was time to go.  How much faster can it get than that.

This old grain elevator caught our eye as we traveled back to Webster.  You do not see many  buildings like this anymore.  Made with a metal exterior it was built to stand the weather regardless of what was going on.  We both commented how beautiful the fields and prarries looked on this trip.

Back at the motel, we cleaned the fish, grabbed some lunch and took a nap.  Our next lake was Bitter.  We will talk about that experience later.

Save Over 70% at the Special Values Sale

 

Good hunting, good fishing and good luck.  Hank

 

 

 

Click on the banner for more great buys.

More Stories By Hank Huntington

Hank Huntington, Esq., is a native of southwest Iowa, healthcare professional, entrepreneur, accomplished pilot, hunting and fishing enthusiast, connoisseur, father and husband. He developed this web site for people to share their fun and excitement about the great outdoors. The best part of this hobby is, after a successful hunting or fishing trip, you are able to dine on fresh game or fish, after all, “ How do you eat a golf ball?” asks Hank. Hanks father and grandfather were both avid outdoorsmen so Hank learned his hunting and fishing skills from them and has passed the tradition down to the fourth generation. Plus the love of the outdoors, and a craving for exquisite dinning, would round out the package.

As a small boy, he fished a local oxbow lake formed by the Missouri River. The lake is primarily old river bottom mud, is not real clear, and has a lot of vegetation. The southeast corner holds a huge lily pad bed, and it was there Hank learned to drag through the water and across the tops of the pads, a Johnson Silver Minnow, with a pork rind attached. This was the place for big mouth bass, and there were lots of them, and young Hank loved to catch them.

At age of 12 Hank started going with his Dad hunting, and by age 14 he was an accomplished shooter with a 12-gauge pump. Shortly after that he was given his first shotgun a Winchester Model 12 pump; he still has it today. It looks like almost new, but the gun is never to be hunted again. Duck hunting in the late 50’s had little pressure after the first two weeks of the season, and when the north wind blew and it got really damp and cold, the big Canada Mallards came.

After graduation from high school, Hank attended Midland College in Fremont, Nebraska. There he met a fellow outdoorsman, and their friendship developed in the fields and streams of central Nebraska.

Hank had little time for hunting and fishing while attending professional school at Creighton University. After graduation he married his college sweetheart and they settled down to career, family, and as often as possible, hunting and fishing.

Hank and his family frequently flew their plane north to Canada to the legendary Canadian fly in lodges to fish for Northern and Walleye. Here he taught his son all the things his father had taught him about fishing. Most of the time the two went alone to the north woods, but when camping was not involved, his wife Pam went along. She always enjoys the fact that she has caught a bigger Northern Pike than Hank, and he has been fishing for 60 years. Today along the Missouri River valley, the deer population increased to the point that in many areas they are a nuisance. The duck, goose, and turkey has also population have also soared.

Area lakes have been well stocked. Many even have a walleye stocking program that makes outstanding fishing. Several are within easy driving distance of Hank’s lodge-like lakeside home. All packaged together is great dining. By the way, Hank harvests only what he will share at a table with family or friends.

Hank says, “Whenever I am on a lake, in the woods, or in the blind, I am always reminded of God’s great bounty and His constant presence. And whether in the great outdoors or at home with my wife, I strive to be a good steward of nature and all that God has given us.”

Good hunting! Good fishing! Good day!